Hella Stocks List

Related ETFs - A few ETFs which own one or more of the above listed Hella stocks.

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    Recent Signals

    Date Stock Signal Type
    2021-05-07 DNZOF New 52 Week High Strength
    2021-05-07 DNZOF Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
    2021-05-07 DNZOF New 52 Week Closing High Bullish
    2021-05-07 DNZOF Stochastic Reached Overbought Strength
    2021-05-07 DNZOF Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
    2021-05-07 DNZOF MACD Bullish Signal Line Cross Bullish
    2021-05-07 HLKHF Narrow Range Bar Range Contraction
    2021-05-07 HLKHF 1,2,3 Pullback Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
    2021-05-07 HLKHF Cup with Handle Other
    2021-05-07 HLKHF Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bullish Bullish Swing Setup
    2021-05-07 HLKHF Boomer Buy Setup Bullish Swing Setup
    2021-05-07 VICA Volume Surge Other
    2021-05-07 VICA Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup
    2021-05-07 VLEEY Bollinger Band Squeeze Range Contraction
    2021-05-07 VLEEY Non-ADX 1,2,3,4 Bearish Bearish Swing Setup

    Recent News for Hella Stocks

    Date Stock Title

    Hella is an American slang term that originated in Bay Area, California, but has since spread to become native slang to all of northern California. It is used as an adverb such as in "hella bad" or "hella good" and was eventually added to the Oxford English Dictionary in 2002. It is possibly a contraction of the phrase "hell of a" or "hell of a lot [of]", in turn reduced to "hell of", though some scholars doubt this etymology since its grammatical usage does not align with those phrases. It often appears in place of the words "really", "a lot", "totally", "very", and in some cases, "yes". Whereas hell of a is generally used with a noun, according to linguist Pamela Munro, hella is primarily used to modify an adjective such as "good".According to lexicographer Allan A. Metcalf, the word is a marker of northern California dialect. According to Colleen Cotter, "Southern Californians know the term ... but rarely use it." Sometimes the term grippa is used to mock "NorCal" dialect, with the actual meaning being the opposite of hella.

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